Client Success Story: Peter

I was very fortunate to work with Daisy as I was retooling my resume and improving my interviewing skills.  She always had the appropriate and useful comment for any issue I presented.  Equally important, she did not use kid-gloves, but rather told me what I needed to hear.  I felt she took a sincere interest in my goals and potential and showed leadership, yes, she lead me to a more marketable position as a candidate.  Indeed, only one month after our sessions ended, I was offered a position. – Peter, NJ 8/2014… Read More

Client Success Story: Jeff

My experience with Daisy was exceptional, and exceeded my expectations. I came to her seeking advice about how to take the next step in my career. She helped me clarify my personal and professional goals, and helped me visualize a career path that met my personal and professional goals. Daisy also helped me see that the perfect role was out there for me, and worked with me on a strategy to find it. Her care, diligence, and thoughtful advice were invaluable throughout the entire process, from career exploration to offer and acceptance. I highly recommend Daisy Swan for anyone looking to grow as a professional. – Jeff, May 2015… Read More

Client Success Story: Kathleen

Like many recent college graduates, I felt lost and alone. I craved to establish a sense of belonging. Afraid to admit my shortcomings, I withdrew into myself. Negative self-talk like, “you are not good enough, smart enough, qualified enough” dominated my thinking. Social gatherings became less desirable.  I did everything I could to avoid the dreaded question, “So what do you do?”  I did not know this person. Where was the determined young woman I worked so hard to become? After a lay off and months of sitting in my pajamas feeling down on myself, I finally had enough. I started researching career counselors in the Los Angeles area, which is how I discovered Daisy Swan. From the beginning Daisy put me at ease with her warm demeanor. She encouraged me to reflect on my values instead of focusing on my fear. I knew I wanted to work with… Read More

Appreciation of Our Differences

This is a great piece on Introversion and Extroversion. We can all get along so long as we pay attention to, and appreciate, our differences.

Heard on All Things Considered

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED, from NPR News. I’m Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I’m Audie Cornish. From Gandhi and Joe DiMaggio to Mother Teresa and Bill Gates, introverts have done a lot of great things in the world. But being quiet, introverted or shy was sometimes looked at as a problem to be overcome.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

UNIDENTIFIED ANNOUNCER: If you’re what they call a shy guy, you’re standing on the outside looking in. You might have something to contribute to their conversation, but nobody cares whether you do or not. There’s a barrier, and you don’t know how to begin breaking it down.

CORNISH: In the 1940s and ’50s, the message to most Americans was, don’t be shy. And in the era of reality television, Twitter and relentless self-promotion, it seems that cultural mandate is in overdrive.

A new book tells the story of how things came to be this way, and it’s called “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking.” The author is Susan Cain, and she joins us from the NPR studios in New York to talk more about it.

Welcome, Susan.

SUSAN CAIN: Thank you. It’s such a pleasure to be here, Audie.

CORNISH: Well, we’re happy to have you. And to start out – I think we should get this on the record – do you consider yourself an introvert or an extrovert?

CAIN: Oh, I definitely consider myself an introvert, and that was part of the fuel for me to write the book.

CORNISH: And what’s the difference between being an introvert versus being shy? I mean, what’s your definition?

CAIN: So introversion is really about having a preference for lower-stimulation environments – so just a preference for quiet, for less noise, for less action – whereas extroverts really crave more stimulation in order to feel at their best. And what’s important to understand about this is that many people believe that introversion is about being antisocial. And that’s really a misperception because actually, it’s just that introverts are differently social. So they would prefer to have, you know, a glass of wine with a close friend as opposed to going to a loud party full of strangers.

Now shyness, on the other hand, is about a fear of negative social judgment. So you can be introverted without having that particular fear at all, and you can be shy but also be an extrovert.

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Interview with author, Vanessa Van Pettan

Years ago I met a young woman at a networking event and we exchanged phone numbers; she was just starting her new business and was interested in talking about what I was doing in my work, and what she was developing. We became fast friends and exchanged plenty of information about how our businesses were developing on and off line. Her name is Vanessa Van Petten and she has grown her new little business into an amazing online resource of services, teachings and now several books for parents all about what it’s like being a teenager from a teen perspective.  I recently spoke to Vanessa when she launched the sale of her new book Do I get My Allowance Before or After I’m Grounded?, about the growth of her business and her experiences publishing three books – one self-published with a self-publishing company, one entirely on her own, and most recently with a big name New York publisher. Have a listen to this candid conversation about growing a business, and the changing challenges and demands of book publishing.

Listen to the audio interview here:

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